sachsen.de
Suche
Übersicht
Kontakt
Languages
eSignatur

Bürger und Freistaat
Land und Leute
Wirtschaft und Umwelt
Bildung und Wissen
Kultur und Freizeit
Sächsisches Landesamt für Umwelt, Landwirtschaft und Geologie Soil Portal Soils in Saxony Soils in Saxony
Sächsisches Landesamt für Umwelt, Landwirtschaft und Geologie (LfULG)
Soils in Saxony
Titelbild: Soils in Saxony.
Introduction
The soils of the old moraine landscapes
The soils of the loess and sandy loess landscapes
The soils of the non-regional river landscapes
The soils of the mountain and hill regions

Ansprechpartner

Dr. Walter Schmidt
E-Mail
0341 9174 116



The soils of the non-regional river landscapes

The Elbe River, like the other major rivers in Saxony, has frequently shifted its river bed. To a limited extent, it formed its "meanders" in its present valley after the Ice Age and its numerous, abandoned river courses are only flooded these days if the water level becomes much higher. In the case of floods, the entire river basin area that is not embanked can become flooded and as a consequence, river basin sediments deposited.
The recent meadow loams of the Elbe River are the result of such floods following the Ice Age. One can also see the increasing impact which people have had on the components and chemistry involved in natural processes.  A case in point is the higher humus content in medieval river deposits: this proves that during this period forests were cleared on a large scale from the lowlands as this would have resulted in significant soil erosion of the humus layer and its subsequent deposition in the river beds.  The soil profile shown (a brown alluvial soil of layered alluvial loam) features an excellent example of the processes described: thicker humus layers can be identified from the grey colouration.

A brown alluvial soil consisting of layered alluvial loam (photograph: Saxon State Office for the Environment and Geology)


80% of the flood plains in Saxony are used as farmland. The extraordinary fertility of the meadow soils caused farmers to continually develop methods for expanding agricultural utilisation of the area. The number of fields is between 50 and 70 points. Intricate drainage systems (which can also be used for irrigation in summer) enabled the development of intensively utilised fields almost everywhere. Pastureland has been pushed back to the narrow strip between the Elbe River shore and dyke systems, and only a few relicts of the meadow forest typical for this location remain.

more information from the Saxon State Office for the Environment and Geology



Inhalt erstellt am 19.12.2006, geändert am 22.01.2007


http://www.smul.sachsen.de/lfulg
Internet des Sächsischen Landesamtes für Umwelt, Landwirtschaft und Geologie Walter.Schmidt@smul.sachsen.de
o